Community Spotlight: Epilepsy Road Warriors Take on the NYC Marathon

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National Epilepsy Awareness Month in Metro New York

As November, National Epilepsy Awareness Month, approaches, we wanted to share some of the ways in which our community is coming together to raise awareness and fund epilepsy education and empowerment programs. You may have read our last post about Team Gabriella and our 1st Annual Into the Light Walk for Epilepsy Awareness on Saturday, November 10th in Hudson River Park (NYC). We’re also excited to introduce you to the Epilepsy Road Warriors, our first team to run the NYC Marathon this Sunday, November 4th. Here are the opening paragraphs of their personal stories. To read their full stories and to learn more about how you can support the team, please visit our team page by clicking HERE or by clicking on each team member’s name below:

Barbara Baldauf, Co-Captain:

The call came early one morning two years ago. My brother, sister-in-law and four year old niece, Siena, were at the hospital. Siena had a grand mal seizure the night before. Paramedics were called and struggled for over 45 minutes to stabilize her. We were stunned. There was no indication prior to this day that she had Epilepsy. There was no family history. This caught us all by surprise.

Bert Chantarat:

I was diagnosed with complex partial epilepsy 16 years ago. Regardless of all the ups and downs along the way, I still consider myself to be very fortunate that my condition is very well controlled with medication. To me, no one is perfectly healthy (really); my brain just likes to tease me with unusual signals once in a while, which leads to a seizure. But with such great support from amazing people in my life, nowadays when it happens I have learned to stop asking what I did wrong to deserve this (okay, I usually bitch about it a little bit), get up and move on.

Jennifer Cunningham, Co-Captain:

As a physician – I always thought I understood Epilepsy. I understood the different seizure types. I understood the medications and their side effects. What I didn’t understand was the impact that Epilepsy has on those that suffer from it. That changed when my beautiful and healthy daughter, Nora, suffered her first grand mal seizure at the age of 5. My life and views on everything changed that day.

Laura Mitchell:

I first joined New York’s epilepsy community as a professional in 2004. In that capacity, I had the opportunity to work with hundreds of individuals and families affected by seizure disorder. I also became close friends with a co-worker whose father was diagnosed with epilepsy when she was six-years-old. Together, we share a commitment to raise epilepsy awareness, so that people affected by seizures have access to the best treatments, services and quality of life possible.

Tara Powers:

First, let me explain the grainy photos. They were taken in May, 1981. That’s me and my father running a 10k when he was 33 and I was 6. His favorite moment was when I bent down and kissed the 4 mile marker. A few months after the race, I woke up one morning to find my father convulsing on the floor. I didn’t know that he had had seizures as a teenager, seizures that were vitually ignored at a time when people didn’t want their families associated with epilepsy. I woke my 10-year-old sister and we called our neighbors.

Alex Rodriguez:

I had my first epileptic seizure when I was seventeen years old. Up until that point, I had never really had any kind of health issue whatsoever. I suddenly went from being able to do basically anything I wanted to being worried about being able to drive, being left alone or even something as mundane as taking a shower. My family was worried sick, and really had no idea as to where to turn or what to expect.

Lindsay Romaine:

On December 9, 2011 the world was granted an angel, my cousin Mary Kate Szokoli. She was 30 years old and lost to her battle with epilepsy. I am running in the NYC marathon on November 4 in honor of her. I have set a goal of raising $2,500 for the Epilepsy Foundation so that others my become aware of the impacts and educated on living with Epilepsy.

Evey Weinberger:

Heres our story I was 13yrs old when I was diagnosed with epilepsy and have been living with it ever since. I am very happy to say that I have been seziure free for 2yrs now. Great right? Well a couple of years ago my little 9yr old sister was diagnosed with epilepsy it crushed my heart I always thought better me then my sisters to have to live with this. Then our other sister had a great idea and started a team called C & E Warriors to encourgae us to walk for the cause on November 10 and to honor her sisters that have to live with this disorder.

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